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SplashData has released A list of the 25 worst passwords of 2013. The top 25 include many passwords used by Adobe users.

SplashData, develops an app for password management, has published its annual list of the 25 worst passwords of 2013. For the first time since the list is compiled, there’re some new entries in the list, in which the term ‘password’ has topped the chart, pushing ‘123456’ at the second place.

After reading the complete list, there’re several new entries that are easy to guess for a novice hacker even. The 2013 list of most common passwords set by online users seems intervened by the Adobe breach, carried out in early October.

In the top 25 worst passwords, the two terms ‘abobe123’ and ‘photoshop’ show that users have a tendency to concatenate or use the name of online services/websites/applications as a their password.

top-10-worst-password-2013-splashdata

“Seeing passwords like ‘adobe123’ and ‘photoshop’ on this list offers a good reminder not to base your password on the name of the website or application you are accessing,” says Morgan Slain, CEO of SplashData.

Using the name of a product to protect your account is one of the many mistakes made by online users that makes it very easy work for hackers.

“Another interesting aspect of this year’s list is that more short numerical passwords showed up even though websites are starting to enforce stronger password policies,” Slain added.

The term ‘admin’, yet another common password, has secured 12th position in the chart, which is mainly used in routers as a default password and never changed.

Although many websites recommend using complex passwords, but there’re still many short numeric passwords in the list, such as ‘1234’, ‘12345’ and ‘000000’. Some other passwords in the Top 10 include ‘qwerty’, ‘abc123’, ‘111111’ and ‘iloveyou’.

SplashData also suggests some tips for choosing secure passwords, such as the use of combinations of characters, numbers and symbols. And of course, you should avoid using the same password for multiple websites and services. There’re several free tools – just Google it — that simplify the creation of random passwords.

In addition, the security firm, Stricture Consulting Group has also published the top 100 most commonly used passwords and claimed that ‘123456’ was used in over 1.9 million accounts last year.

Source: SplashData

2 COMMENTS

  1. All people need are password managers and then they only have to remember ONE password to login to the password manager. Most password managers are free for personal use, so there’s really no excuse for this. People using “123456”, as a password for anything in 2014 is ridiculous and they almost deserve to get hacked!

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