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UPDATE: About 650 went without power overnight after storm-caused outages in Clarksville | ClarksvilleNow.com – Clarksville Now

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Update, 7:15 a.m. Saturday: About 640 CDE Lightband customers were without power overnight as the utility worked on 34 outages, mostly in the south end of Clarksville.

“Crews have worked through the night and will continue till all power is restored,” CDE said. “We thank you for your continued patience!”

Update, 11:10 p.m.: CDE outages are affecting about 640 customers.
For CEMC in Montgomery County, almost all outages are over, with all power expected to be restored by midnight.

Update, 10:30 p.m.: CDE has 34 outages affecting about 960 customers. For CEMC in Montgomery County, about 20 customers are without power.
Update, 9:50 p.m.: CDE has 35 outages affecting about 1,681 customers. For CEMC in Montgomery County, about 50 customers are without power.
Update, 8:30 p.m.: CDE outages are down to about 1,500. CEMC outages in Montgomery County are down to about 180.

Update, 7 p.m.: CDE outages are down to about 3,000. CEMC outages in Montgomery County are down to about 200.
Update, 6:15 p.m.: With about 5,000 households still without power, CDE is warning customers that some outages may last all night.
“Those who rely on a medical device that requires power should be making alternative arrangements in case you are still without power overnight,” CDE said.

Update, 5:30 p.m.: CDE outages are down to 5,100. CEMC outages in Montgomery County are down to 700.
CEMC outages are widespread in rural areas. “We are unable to give estimated restoration times due to the amount of incidents and widespread nature of the outages,” CEMC said. “Thank you for your patience.”
Update, 5 p.m.: CDE outages are down to 6,700. CEMC outages in Montgomery County are down to 700.

Update, 4:10 p.m.: With about 8,000 customers still without power, CDE said crews are doing everything they can to get power restored.
“Many people are understandably concerned about the length of time without power,” the statement said. “With strong winds like we saw today, broken trees and limbs are the main culprit for downed lines and poles.
“Safety is a major concern, especially in the beginning, as the damage areas have to be thoroughly accessed. Replacing broken poles is more time-consuming than pulling up wire,” CDE said.

“We have tree trimmers distributed throughout the city clearing areas for our line workers to do what they need to do. If you rely on a medical device that requires power, you should look at making alternative arrangements in case you are still without power overnight.”
Update, 3 p.m.: CDE outages are down to 8,700. CEMC outages are down to 900.
Update, 2:20 p.m.: CDE outages are down to 8,500. CEMC outages are down to 2,400.

With so many outages, CDE said, “we cannot give an exact restoration time. Crews will work around the clock until everyone’s power is back on. We appreciate everyone’s patience.”
Update, 12 p.m.: CDE outages are down to 11,000. CEMC outages are down to 4,100.
Drivers are reminded that when a traffic signal is out, the intersection becomes a four-way stop.

Update, 11:35 a.m.: The number of CDE outages has climbed to about 14,100, with the addition of over 2,000 outages near Fort Campbell.
Update, 11 a.m.: CDE Lightband reports that heavy winds took down trees and wires in multiple areas, causing thousands of customers to lose power.
“We have all of our crews in right now, and we have called in multiple contractors to help get power restored,” CDE’s Lindsey Pease told Clarksville Now. “We’ll work 24/7 to make sure everyone gets their power turned back on.”

She cautioned that people should stay away from downed power lines. If you see any down, call 911 or call CDE at 931-648-8151.
Heavy winds also caused damage in the Woodlawn area.
“We do have crews out and about working to restore power,” CEMC’s Julie Wallace said. “We’ll get everyone back on just as soon as possible.”

As of 11 a.m., about 4,500 CEMC customers were without power.
Update, 10:15 a.m.: The power is out at Veterans Plaza and in the surrounding area, to include the Bi-County Transfer Station on Highway Drive.
Montgomery County government services in Veterans Plaza will be suspended until the power returns.

Update, 10 a.m.: A Severe Thunderstorm Watch remains in effect for Montgomery and surrounding counties until 2 p.m. today.
Update, 9:50 a.m.: About 10,100 households in Clarksville have lost power. The outages were centered in four areas: The Crossland Avenue area, the Dover Crossing area, the Peachers Mill Road area, and an area near Northeast High School.
Another 6,200 CEMC customers in Montgomery County, outside the Clarksville city limits, have lost power.

Update, 9:45 a.m.: The Severe Thunderstorm Warning has been extended to 10 a.m.
At 9:35 a.m., severe thunderstorms were located along a line extending from 10 miles west of Coopertown to 11 miles southeast of Clarksville to near Tennessee Ridge, moving southeast at 55 mph.
Update, 9:20 a.m.: A Severe Thunderstorm Warning has been issued for Montgomery County, Stewart County and northwestern Robertson County until 9:45 a.m.

At 9:02 a.m., severe thunderstorms were located along a line extending from near Dunmor to 12 miles east of Murray, moving southeast at 45 mph.
There’s a risk of 60 mph wind gusts and penny size hail. Expect damage to roofs, siding, and trees.
For local severe weather alerts and updates, tune in to radio stations Beaver 100.3, Q108, Z97.5, Rewind 94.3 or NewZee 105.5.

Previously:
CLARKSVILLE, TN (CLARKSVILLE NOW) – A cold front is bringing thunderstorms through our region, prompting a Severe Thunderstorm Warning for Fort Campbell.
There’s a risk of half-inch hail and damaging winds greater than 52 mph on post, according to a Fort Campbell alert. The warning is in effect from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. today.

Strong to severe thunderstorms will be possible in Clarksville, and straight line wind damage will be the primary threat, according to the National Weather Service.
The timeframe for storms will be late morning and into the afternoon.
Coming up next week, a returning heatwave will be possible across the mid-state, with high temperatures reaching near 100 degrees.

“Humidity levels, however, will be low enough to probably keep heat index values below the advisory threshold,” the NWS said. “Nevertheless, it will be quite hot.”

Clarksville forecast

Here’s the day-by-day outlook.
Today: A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly between 10am and 3pm. Mostly sunny, with a high near 94. Heat index values as high as 102. West northwest wind 5 to 10 mph.

Tonight: A 10 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms before 7pm. Partly cloudy, with a low around 69. North northwest wind 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday: Sunny, with a high near 88. North northeast wind 5 to 10 mph.
Saturday night: Clear, with a low around 57. North northeast wind 5 to 10 mph.

Juneteenth: Sunny, with a high near 87. East northeast wind 5 to 10 mph.
Sunday night: Mostly clear, with a low around 58. East northeast wind around 5 mph.
Monday: Sunny, with a high near 95. Calm wind becoming east southeast around 5 mph in the morning.

Monday night: Mostly clear, with a low around 67. East wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the evening.
Tuesday: Sunny and hot, with a high near 99. South wind 5 to 10 mph becoming west in the afternoon.
Tuesday night: Mostly clear, with a low around 72.

Wednesday: Sunny and hot, with a high near 100.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear, with a low around 74.
Thursday: Sunny and hot, with a high near 99.(CEMC, contributed)

Chris Smith is editor-in-chief of ClarksvilleNow.com. Reach him by email at csmith@clarksvillenow.com or call 931-648-7720.

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