Google Authorship has reached its end; could Google bid its social network “adieu”?

Remember how easy it was to improve your article rank if you had a healthy Google+ following? It was once key to your success on the Google search engine to have a healthy following of individuals, to promote your Google+ profile, and make social media a big deal. Some positions in the tech world today still mandate a healthy Google+ profile, even though a social media profile from any site (be it Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and others) only tell a portion of the story of a person’s ability. Google still mandates quality articles in order to “see your article in lights.”

Google Authorship provided a gateway into one’s success on Google news. Often, when a person published an article, his or her Google+ photo would be provided along with the individual’s name as a blue hyperlink that, when clicked, would take you to the individual’s Google+ page.

However, Google made Google+ a big deal because, when Google started its social network, Google+ was a big deal. The company seemed interested in taking its social network to the kind of level that could compete with Facebook’s rising success. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s financial worth has risen on the backs of his social media site that still remains untouched in its numbers to this day.

See Also: Google removes privacy app from Play Store, cites agreement violation.

Now, however, Google is killing off Google Authorship, meaning that your fancy Google+ profile with your 8,000 followers won’t mean as much to the success of your work anymore. It may mean a lot to that article reader who thinks your famous and adds you as a friend (though you have no idea who they’re because they don’t introduce themselves), but it won’t mean much to Google.

See Also: Google Inc. acquires visual effects firm Zync Inc. for cloud platform.

And with the death of Google authorship, some are asking the question, “What’s to become of Google+?” The answer, in a phrase, is “It’ll die off, eventually.” We’ve seen that Google+ head Vic Gundotra left Google earlier this Spring, which is always a bad sign. We’ve also seen Google joining Facebook’s Instagram earlier this Spring, another indication that Google’s turned its social media hopes to other companies that can do it better. And it’s understandable as to why Google’s done this: with its money invested in robotics, drones, Google X lab projects, and the 30 companies it’s purchased this year (such as Nest, Dropcam, Titan Aerospace, DeepMind Technologies, Directr, and Gecko), the search engine giant’s got its sights set on other ventures.

See Also: Google driverless vehicles needs drivers, says California DMV.

Oh, one more thing: Google intends to separate its unlimited cloud storage from Google+. If this doesn’t tell you how soon Google+ could be no more, then nothing will.

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