The National Safety Council advises drivers to go easy on using Google Glass while driving, and says it can be as distracting as texting while driving.

If you thought a pair of glasses that are wireless connected to all of your wireless gadgets was very cool, but a massive risk to those on the road – well you were right.

The National Safety Council is advising drivers to go lightly on the use of one of Google’s hottest new gadgets to send text messages. As it turns out, and experiment involving 40 volunteers found that in a simulator – the drivers were still too distracted while sending a message via Google Glass, as if they were actually typing out the text message with their hands.

Granted, Glass gave drivers one advantage – that is to recover more quickly from mistakes, or obstructions in the road – but the point overall is that it takes away from focus on the road. Which is ultimately where it should be.

The Security Council’s Ben Sawyer said that “texting with either a smartphone or glass will cause distraction and should be avoided while driving.”

See Also: Google Glass Explorer available for $1500 on Play store in US.

Overall, the message that even though the device is “hands free,” it still brings a great deal of distraction to users, especially when so much emphasis has already been put on not texting and driving in the United States.

Texting on a smartphone is illegal in a lot of states across the United States. However, it remains common, even though 1.6 million crashes happen each year as result of texting and driving. The bigger picture problem with technology like this is that it encourages multitasking.
While driving, it’s been long-debated what things are distracting, versus what things are safe to do – while driving.

The bottom line is that anything that can distract a driver is a threat to themselves, and other motorists. The study showed that using either device “negatively impacted” reaction time, and that even though “some areas of improved performance” were seen in terms of being able to react from a brake event – it didn’t change that reactions were still slower than those who were simply driving.

See Also: Google Glass app Shore can measure emotions through facial expression.

Even the National Safety Council admitted though that eliminating technology and stopping people from using these hands free devices would be nearly impossible, but that Google has an opportunity to lead the way in terms of creating options that allow drivers to get information with minimal distraction from start to finish.

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