Amelia Earhart’s plane that famously went amiss 77 years ago may have finally had a part of its body identified after years of speculation.

Amelia Earhart’s story may finally be changing and getting some closure. However, that means much more research is going to be happening between now and then. The fact is that a piece of metal that was recovered in 1991 looks like it is a piece of aluminum which was a part of Earhart’s lost aircraft.

Scientists have said with a relatively high degree of certainty that the aluminum plate that was found, was a piece of metal that was installed on the plane when it made its fourth stop in Miami to have small repairs made. The debris though was recovered a significant distance from Miami.

The piece of aluminum was discovered and recovered from Nikumaroro, an atoll in the Pacific Ocean. The atoll is a part of the southwester Pacific republic of Kiribati. The island is completely uninhibited and offers a new, and unique viewpoint of what happened when everything went wrong for Earhart, who was attempting to circumnavigate the globe at the equator line.

However, this find leaves little uncertainty as to whether this actually belongs to Earhart’s aircraft simply due to the structure of the plate that was found. The plate which originally covered a navigational window, and was installed in Miami had rivets on it that would have been entirely exclusive to her aircraft. Researchers have even gone as far as to say that the rivets on this plate would be as exclusive as a fingerprint. This is ultimately what gives such credibility to the discovery.

The major change to the overall story that was, and is Amelia Earhart is the fact that it lends to an entirely different outcome than was originally thought. Instead of being the victims of a crash in the Pacific Ocean, we’re left with the theory – that is backed up by science – and heavily indicates that the two individuals on the plane survived the landing, which was not fatal, and died as castaways on this island.

See Also: African Lions can be saved under U.S. law, Fish and Wildlife Service announced.

Officials said that “Earhart sent radio distress calls for at least five nights before the Electra was washed into the ocean by rising tides and surf.” Overall, this is something that entirely changes the mindset behind the Amelia Earhart story, and even lends to discovering Earhart herself somewhere on the island.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.