Apple has found itself back in court again, explaining away more anti-competition claims that the company acted inappropriately by deleting non-iTunes music from iPods until 2009.

Apple has been at the top of the smartphone world in the eyes of many for years now, even though global market share doesn’t quite dictate that story. However, the success of the Apple iPhone now, has a lot to do with the way the company did business – and the success of their business in the first decade of the century. The device that changed the world, especially the tech-gadget world, was the iPod – which eventually paved the way for the iPhone, iPad, and well – i-Everything.

The development of the company which was largely due to their revolution in the hardware and software world – as they were the first major company to successfully link the two entities in an integrated system that would bring content to people. Technology that would significantly change the way smartphones were perceived, used, and interacted with. Now, everything seems to have the same characteristics – especially services that are utilized on a smartphone, or tablet.

That being said though, Apple has found their way back into a courtroom this week defending their actions in the latter half of the previous decade. The claims argue that Apple knowingly erased non-iTunes content from iPods without consumer knowledge. The claims are harshly contested by Apple lawyers who argue that ultimately this was all done in an effort to maintain simplicity throughout their system, and ensure the security of their devices – which were undoubtedly far less understood then – than they are now.

The class action lawsuit is seeking $350 million, and even though the technology used that was guilty of ensuring non-iTunes media was eliminated from the iPod in 2009 – the allegations are just the most-recent lineup of questions that make Apple seem demonstrative, and unethical in their behaviors. RealNetworks was the major competitor for Apple at the time when it came to music and content that was going on these media players – or more specifically iPods, but even the former CEO and Founder of the company, Steve Jobs had harsh words for those who questioned their tactics, despite the docile reasons lawyers argue Apple used the product. When asked about a statement that Apple made regarding RealNetworks and their content, which was seen as aggressive, Steve Jobs noted that a “strong response from Apple would be a lawsuit,” echoing the firm beliefs that the company had regarding competitors and their attempts to crash Apple’s market share.

See Also: After Firefox, Yahoo aims Apple Safari as default search engine.

While this is likely to cause some waves in terms of the “PR” of the story, it’s unlikely to change the way Apple does anything operationally today. This though, is just the latest example of companies and consumers firing back at the company who has been known to fire back at others in the past.

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