Lenovo had their issues amplified yesterday as the hacker group Lizard Squad claimed responsibility for hacking the website, which was attacked using what’s called a DNS attack.

Lenovo has found themselves in the news over the course of the last two weeks for all the wrong reasons. First, the company was criticized for using an adware called Superfish, which tracked and placed ads on Lenovo computers. Even as Lenovo said that they had shut down Superfish on the PC’s which had the adware program installed on them – customers and the security world continued to thrive on the story. Once it was realized that the adware could actually be exploited because it was replicating secure addresses on a computer – and a better understanding of the adware – that was being complained about since mid-2014 – was had, the company had no choice but to react.

Lenovo released an update that would allow users to remove Superfish completely, and all of the remnants of the adware. However, the company was thrown yet another curveball yesterday, as their website was hijacked by the hacker group Lizard Squad. The hack equated to a series of DNS attacks – that are labeled as attacks against the Domain Name System. Even some Google websites were impacted. The websites redirected to a site that played a song called “Breaking Free” from a Disney movie, as well as showing a photo of a young man or child sitting in a bedroom.

See Also: Superfish gets STINKY! Lenovo faces lawsuit for betraying their PC users.

It was a very strange scenario, but it was one that even compromised some of the company’s emails – that may or may not have even larger impacts in the long-term. While it isn’t clear what information was caught from those emails, the company did apologize to customers by noting that they “regret any inconvenience that our users may have if they are not able to access parts of our site at this time.” They said, “We are actively reviewing our network security and will take appropriate steps to bolster our site and to protect the integrity of our users’ information.”

This though hasn’t just been a disruptive, or annoying ordeal for Lenovo. This has been damaging to the company’s image, and reputation – that was before this event – climbing steadily. While it’s unclear how this will impact sales and marketing moving forward – it definitely will speak to change that will be necessary in order to help spur a better movement around the security space online.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.