Microsoft is making way for Project Spartan, by severely reducing the role of Internet Explorer – leaving it only for older websites and enterprise users.

Microsoft has been sending a lot of mixed signals in recent weeks regarding what the future of Internet Explorer actually looks like. Now though, it would appear as though the end is near for the browser that has been a staple in the computing world for nearly two decades. While twenty years is a long life for anything in the tech world – Project Spartan will be replacing Internet Explorer – but its name and branding are still questions even those at Microsoft are still wrestling with.

Chris Capossela, who is Microsoft’s marketing chief, pointed out, “We’ll continue to have Internet Explorer, but we’ll also have a new browser called Project Spartan, which is codenamed Project Spartan. We have to name the thing.” He then went on to point out that Microsoft is “now researching what the new brand or the new name, for our browser should be in Windows 10.”

The clear indication all along has been that things are changing in a major way when Microsoft officially launches Windows 10. The move is one that has been welcomed by users who have grown sick and tired of a challenged operating system. Windows 8 struggled in every way throughout its life, and the company lost valuable enterprise users who otherwise would have remained with the company – and those who did – remained with older operating systems. That was increasingly obvious recently, as the company announced that Windows 7 had become the biggest operating system for Microsoft.

That being said though, users will still have Internet Explorer as an option in the next operating system that Microsoft puts out. The only exception being that its role within the Windows ecosystem will be greatly reduced. As Chrome and Firefox have gained momentum on Windows though, this isn’t something that too many users should find problematic – and if Project Spartan lives up to the hype – it will most certainly be a welcomed change – as other browsers have really improved their function.

This is many ways though will be the end for Internet Explorer as people know it today. Right now, as it stands on Windows 8, will likely be the final version that Microsoft puts on the market before the launch of Windows 10 this summer, or fall, which will officially unveil the new operating system.

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