The Eiffel Tower has officially disappeared as Paris, France battles one of the worst smog outbreaks in the history of the city sending city planners to implement emergency measures.

Eiffel Tower onlookers are seeing very little as the pollution level rises in Paris, France to levels that haven’t been seen in nearly a year. While the city has had a history of battling pollution and smog around its iconic site – city authorities haven’t needed to implement any serious bans until now. The city will be introducing a reduction of overall traffic into the city, by 50% beginning Monday, and will also be reducing the speed of traffic in the city to 12mph.

Hybrid vehicles, as well as electric vehicles, will be allowed on Monday, as well as vehicles that have an odd-numbered license plate. The move comes at a time when Paris is battling some of the worst conditions it has ever seen with regards to pollution. The mayor’s office made the announcement over the weekend that the reductions would be taking place, and the only thing that city officials haven’t announced, is a plan to make city transportation free.

The move is one that is somewhat curious, given the fact that people will still need to get to work, need to commute within the city, and at this point – find other methods to make their appointments without a modified approach from the government itself within the city. Plume Labs who evaluates the air condition in given locations around the world – actually pointed out that Paris had the outright dirtiest air at one point last week – making news globally for a right usually reserved for other cities around the world.

Around Paris though, there are other communities and cities that are implementing comparable bans on travel and use of vehicles. While none has appeared to be as suffocating as the restrictions placed on those who live in Paris – the city clearly has something significant on its hands. Another company though called Airparif, pointed out that this isn’t something that’s new. They said, “The pollution levels are consistent. If we don’t go over the alert level, we won’t be far away,” shortly after the record levels were reached. It showed the overall problem that exists in Paris and shows just how much improvement is needed to protect one of the most historic cities in the world.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.