New Years has officially happened on Mars and NASA is wishing all the Martians out there a happy New Years, as study on the Red Planet continues to expand.

Mars, Pennsylvania played host to a celebration of Martian proportion, as scientists and enthusiasts alike gathered to celebrate New Years on the Red Planet. The move was one that came with little surprise as Mars, Pennsylvania regularly plays host to major events like this, which key in on celebrating the Red Planet.

The frequency of a Martian year is something of a slower turn. For Mars, a year lasts approximately two Earth years. That means that the next time Mars will be having a celebration like this it will be 2017. At this point though, a large part of the excitement comes from scientists having extensive time to study and look more closely at the Martian planet as a whole.

Another major point of the celebration was to get young people excited in this part of the science fields. These fields, which typically experience higher than usual rates of an educational requirement, often are pushed away as unattractive fields of study. However, for those who put this event on, it was an opportunity to change that stigma and make it a positive one.

Greg Hartung, who is the mayor of Mars, Pennsylvania said of the celebration, “Three parts of NASA coming together to bring things to Mars, Pennsylvania, to celebrate Mars’ New Year. NASA has done great – way beyond what we expected.” He wasn’t alone in sharing that excitement. The community as a whole has responded increasingly well to the celebration and excitement of the Mars advancements. This celebration only frames those achievements.

See Also: Polar bears are eating ice trapped white-beaked dolphins.

In the long-term, the goal is to land a manned craft on the Red Planet. While that might seem like something that is a ways off at this point, there is good reason to see this as something immediate in the long-term plan. Studying what is happening on Mars though, and more importantly determining what life is on Mars, if any, has been a priority of every space science team on the planet – and that goal isn’t changing at all in the years.

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