SHARE
mark-zuckerberg-twitter-pinterest-hack-linkedin-password-dump

Not only strong password but experts are also suggesting changing password regularly to ensure hackers don’t have a free run at our online activities.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s Twitter and Pinterest accounts have been hacked, and last month’s huge LinkedIn password dump being considered the reason behind this high profile security breach.

The group that pulled up the feat, OurMine revealed Zuckerberg used the password “dadada” to login to Pinterest and Twitter. Perhaps the Facebook founder isn’t too serious with his activities at either of the two social media sites, which should explain his reliance on a password as simple as that.

Of course Zuckerberg can’t feign ignorance about the critical importance of adopting credible login measures, himself being the owner of the world’s largest social media site. And that starts with using a strong password in the first place.

Zuckerberg’s Facebook account remains intact though. It also applies to his Instagram account as well, even though it is the contrary that was initially being circulated.

Twitter was quick to the rescue act. The account which was earlier found suspended has since being resurrected while the particular tweet boasting the hack has also been deleted.

In contrast, Pinterest was a bit late in responding to the situation. However, it restored the account.

See Also: MySpace hack is enormous with 360,213,024 records available online for purchase

The above hack can be attributed to the usual practice among netizens to use the same password for multiple sites. While that is done to save the inconvenience of having to maintain a plethora of complex passwords, each of different sites, experts suggest the best option will be changing passwords at regular intervals to thwart hacking attempts.

LinkedIn, on its part, has already invalidated the login credentials of all accounts the details of which were made public a few weeks ago. While, affected users at the professional network might have already reset their passwords, this should also serve as a reminder for them to use new passwords for every other site that relied on the old LinkedIn passwords. And the sooner that is done the better.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here