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While Verizon’s new non-contractual unlimited plan seems lucrative, its biggest impediment is that it is prone to deprioritized during network congestions.

Verizon has announced a new unlimited data plan, and it costs just $80. If that sounds too tempting, well the devil is in the finer aspects of the deal.

For one, the new unlimited data plan does not require agreeing to any contractual obligations. There is no credit check required as well while customers are provided unlimited talk, text and data package all for a monthly remuneration of $80.

In fact, customers will have the option to text to more than 200 regions internationally. That is not all as the package also includes unlimited calls to the neighboring countries of Mexico and Canada.

So far so good though the plan also calls for quite a few compromises to be made as well. And perhaps the biggest of those is that the subscribers would be the first in line to have their service deprioritized once network congestion reaches critical levels. So you will need a lot of luck to have access to the unlimited services during peak hours or in business intensive areas.

That apart, video streaming will also be limited to just 480p, besides ruling out mobile hotspot or tethering as well.

In fact, the above plan compares miserably to Verizon’s own contracted unlimited data plan that too costs $80 a month but is without any of the caveats prevalent in the new prepaid plan. The contracted unlimited plan allows for HD quality video streaming and 10 GB of a mobile hotspot at LTE speeds. Above all, the data will be deprioritized only after the user has exhausted the monthly 22 GB limit.

In the pre-paid space, T-Mobile too has an unlimited data plan that again costs $75 but fares better than Verizon’s. For instance, the carrier allows for a monthly data limit of 30 GB and seeks to deprioritize your data only post that. T-Mobile allows for mobile tethering as well though only at 3G speeds.

In the end, what seems amply clear is that the unlimited data plans are here big time and more such plans could be in the offing as carriers rush to hold on to their customer base in a market that is becomingly increasingly saturated.

1 COMMENT

  1. Yes but Verizon towers are not apparently congested as t mobile. I could use t mobile at 1:00 pm, 1:00 am, 8:00 am, 8:00 pm etc and be slower than watching grass grow.

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