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Tesla to increase Full Self-Driving package as it unveils update that adds an 'Assertive mode' – Daily Mail

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By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail.com
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Elon Musk‘s Tesla had a busy weekend – the company announced its Full Self-Driving (FSD) package will increase to $12,000 starting January 17 and it rolled out a software update to the system.
The cost of the FSD premium option is a $2,000 increase, but according to Musk it will only be available in the US.
Tesla also unleased the latest FSD beta 10.3 with three driving modes that gives vehicles a ‘Chill,’ ‘Average’ or ‘Assertive’ approach while on the road.
The Assertive mode, however, has caused a stir among the public, as it may perform rolling stops, which many people say is illegal in most US states.
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The cost of the FSD premium option is a $2,000 increase, but according to Musk it will only be available in the US
Tesla’s FSD is available to drivers with high safety scores of 100 out of 100.
These scores were decided by drivers giving the firm permission to monitor their driving using in-car software. The scores will be ranked per 100 miles of driving.
Once approved, these drivers will have access to exclusive features like summon that lets drivers move the vehicle in and out of tight space using the companion app or the three new driving modes just added.
Those who choose ‘Assertive’ ‘will have a smaller follow distance, perform more frequent speed lane changes, will not exit passing lanes and may perform rolling stops.’
Tesla also unleased the latest FSD beta 10.3 with three driving modes that gives the vehicle a ‘Chill,’ ‘Average’ or ‘Assertive’ approach while on the road. Tech writer David Zipper , who seems to have shared the first news of the modes, jokes on Twitter saying: ‘I guess ‘Road Rage Mode’ didn’t fit on the screen’
Tesla’s FSD is available to drivers with high safety scores of 100 out of 100. These scores were decided by drivers giving the firm permission to monitor their driving using in-car software. The scores will be ranked per 100 miles of driving
A rolling stop refers to the act of not coming to a complete stop while driving, but just slowing down to a slow, ‘rolling’ speed, and it is sometimes referred to as a California stop. 
It is illegal in Texas, California and other US states, but the act is permitted in New Jersey. 
Tech writer David Zipper, who seems to have shared the first news of the modes, jokes on Twitter saying: ‘I guess ‘Road Rage Mode’ didn’t fit on the screen.’
A screen shot shared on Twitter by Digtalhen shows ‘Average’ may also perform rolling stops, while ‘Chill’ ‘will have a larger follow distance and perform fewer speed lane changes.’
The last FSD software roll out hit in October, but Musk was forced to pull the release after several issues were found.
A screen shot shared on Twitter by Digtalhen shows ‘Average’ may also perform rolling stops, while ‘Chill’ ‘will have a larger follow distance and perform fewer speed lane changes
‘Please note, this is to be expected with beta software. It is impossible to test all hardware configs in all conditions with internal QA, hence public beta,’ the CEO tweeted.
Several issues from Tesla owners surfaced on Twitter, with many citing problems with braking functions and fake front collision warnings.
The issues were later fixed, unlike several mechanical issues that were found among nearly a half a million Model 3 and Model S vehicles.
The ‘Chill’ mode seems to be the least aggressive driving option released in the software update
Tesla announced a recall on December 30 to address issues that increase the risk of crashing.
A total of 356,309 Model 3 vehicles made between 2017 and 2020 are being recalled due to problems with the rearview camera and 119,009 Model S vehicles due to front trunk problems.
Tesla warns that for the specific Model 3 vehicles, opening and closing the trunk could damage the cable harness attaching the rearview camera, causing the camera to suddenly fail.
And the Model S issue could stop the front trunk from latching, allowing it to swing up while the vehicle is in motion.
According to Tesla, only about one percent of the Model 3 cars have the flaw, while 14 percent of the Model S vehicles.
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Published by Associated Newspapers Ltd
Part of the Daily Mail, The Mail on Sunday & Metro Media Group

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She has spent the past eight years playing the role of an infrastructure consultant, and has now joined Inferse.com as a full time blogger. Her current profession is a result of her deep interest in computer gadgets, laptops, gaming accessories and other tech happenings.

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