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Google made it clear that if you receive emails that cannot be authenticated with either SPF or DKIM, you will be notified in the form of a question mark

Search giant Google is aiming to make your Gmail experience safer by introducing two new security warnings. According to Google Apps update alerts, the company is rolling out two new safety warnings in Gmail starting this week in order to make your email experience safer.

Google has made it clear that if you receive any email in your inbox that cannot be authenticated with either Sender Policy Framework (SPF) or DKIM, you will come across a question mark instead of sender’s profile picture or avatar. It works on both web and Android.

Google further explained that whenever you receive an email containing a URL directing to some dangerous or malicious websites that are known for running unwanted software, malware, or phishing scripts, you will get a warning message – ‘Visiting this website may harm your computer!’ upon clicking n the URL.

Gmail Warnings

“Not all affected email will necessarily be dangerous. But we encourage you to be extra careful about replying to, or clicking on links in messages that you’re not sure about. And with these updates, you’ll have the tools to make these kinds of decisions,” Google said.

“These warnings are an extension of the Safe Browsing protection available to various web browsers today,” it added.

This latest move by Google may help the company tackle problems that frequently lead to email spoofing, phishing attacks, and several risky email attacks. According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), such issues have cost companies over $3.1 billion since almost three years for now.

Gmail Warnings

Google also has the HTTP Strict Transport Security (HSTS) planned to roll out to google.com in order to make its data encryption even stronger. So that it will be a lot easier for the company to keep its platform in safe hands by getting rid of eavesdroppers, man-in-the-middle attacks, and hijackers who always manage to spoil things.

Back in 2014, the search giant came up with a Google Chrome extension – End-to-End. The extension does the job of offering a simple method to establish a secure end-to-end encryption between senders and receivers on email.

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