Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg announces his wife’s new pregnancy while discussing the couple’s three tragic miscarriages.

Miscarriage. It’s a word that no woman wants to hear, particularly married women who take upon themselves the expectation of producing heirs and future family members. It’s the worst nightmare for a man who longs to be a father, who hates to hear those words after he’s discovered that his wife is pregnant with his first son. I have been affected by the word, seeing that my twin sister and brother-in-law lost have had two miscarriages – one before my now 2-year-old niece, and one after her. And now, they’re expecting a baby boy, their first son and my first nephew, as of January 2016.

Well, tragedy comes to us all, including one of the wealthiest men in the world. Facebook Founder Mark Zuckerberg and his wife, Priscilla Chan, have recently announced their new pregnancy. At the same time, however, Mark and Priscilla have had three miscarriages prior to this new pregnancy. Tons of messages of “congratulations” were issued to the couple at Facebook on Friday, with many commenters identifying with the tragedy of miscarriage. “My husband and I are going through the same thing. We just had a miscarriage in May…so it’s nice to know I’m not alone,” said one commenter.

Mark Zuckerberg himself took to Facebook to express his thoughts on he and Priscilla’s three miscarriages: “Most people don’t discuss because you worry your problems will distance you or reflect upon you – as if you’re defective or did something to cause this. So you struggle on your own. In today’s open and connected world, discussing these issues doesn’t distance us; it brings us together. It creates understanding and tolerance, and it gives us hope,” Zuckerberg said.

Twenty percent of all pregnancies end in miscarriage, according to medical experts, and are more common than many believe them to be. In the end, however, it’s nice to see the Facebook founder share something personal that can reach out and touch others in positive ways. Sadly, Facebook is used for so many things that are irrelevant and useless in this day and time. And often, so many friends and neighbors of a saddened victim couple of miscarriage post their ultrasounds, baby clothing and gear, and pictures of birthday parties without considering the pain and suffering of others.

See Also: Facebook readies solar powered unmanned Aquila to provide internet connectivity.

It is our hope that Zuckerberg’s strength in talking about the couple’s tragedies will inspire Facebook posters to take some time to consider the sad plights of others. Not everyone’s pregnancies come out great, and some women long to be pregnant but are unable to conceive. And, additionally, some individuals long to be married and have families but are unable in their present circumstances. Sometimes, instead of posting “look at how happy we are” pictures and statements, just typing “to the woman who’s heart is broken over a miscarriage, I’m thinking of you” and pressing “post” will suffice.

3 COMMENTS

  1. The “tragedy of miscarriage” in a society where there is a well funded market for the taking and use of fetal body parts for research. Seems strangely discordant.

  2. I find it hard to believe that those who long for children, yet have not been able to become pregnant, would want those who have children and/or are pregnant to not celebrate with their friends and family on Facebook. Your quote by Mark Zuckerberg “In today’s open and connected world, discussing these issues doesn’t distance us; it brings us together. It creates understanding and tolerance, and it gives us hope.” Mr. Zuckerberg highlights the fact that sharing our joy is a good thing.

    • We should share the good things that happen to us, but there is a way to share it. Sharing a new ultrasound every week of your child-to-be goes above and beyond sharing the good news. It becomes an insult to women who are infertile and don’t want to be haunted with it every day of their lives.

      I speak from experience with my own sister. The last thing she wanted to do was look on Facebook and see couples posting something about their good news every day. Sometimes, taking the time to consider the plight of others is a good thing.

      I think you’re taking his statement out of context. Obviously, there’s a moderation to how much we share. The fact that he also shared his tragic miscarriages shows that Zuckerberg doesn’t think Facebook should be a “social facade” for so many people who only share the good and not the tragic and difficult. There is such a thing as inconsiderate posting, and it’s naive to assume otherwise.

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