Microsoft is taking its HoloLens on the road of the US and Canada in October and November. The AR headset will be reaching developers early next year.

Microsoft has announced that it’ll be touring across 11 cities in the US and Canada with its HoloLens augmented reality headset. The software giant will be showing off demos to developers as to how they can build apps for HoloLens.

The tour starts in the company’s hometown of Seattle on October 13, followed by Toronto, Salt Lake City, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York City, Minneapolis, Phoenix, Atlanta and finally ends in Austin.

The developer version of the headset is set to arrive in the first quarter of 2016 in the US and Canada, though they’ll have to shell out $3000 to get hold of the test unit.

For more information on how to apply or register for your space in the limited demos, just head over to the Microsoft HoloLens Roadshow 2015’s website.

  • Seattle: Oct. 13-16
  • Toronto: Oct. 19-22
  • Salt Lake City: Oct. 20-22
  • Chicago: Oct. 26-29
  • San Francisco: Oct. 26-30
  • Los Angeles: Nov. 2-5
  • New York City: Nov. 2-5
  • Minneapolis: Nov. 9-11
  • Phoenix: Nov. 10-12
  • Atlanta: Nov. 17-19
  • Austin: Nov. 17-20

Microsoft’s headset has a lot more going on compared to developer versions of Google Glass, as HoloLens functions as a standalone computer that includes a custom “holographic processing unit,” hence the higher price tag. Our sources suggest that the headset has an x86 processor, 2GB RAM, 802.11ac, and offers a 60Hz refresh rate.

Meanwhile, the company recently gave us a rather spectacular demo of HoloLens augmented reality headset during its media event earlier this week. Microsoft demonstrated the headset with a new mixed virtual reality game called ‘Project X Ray’. The game essentially turns your house into a customized video game level.

Microsoft HoloLens and Project X Ray
Microsoft HoloLens and Project X Ray

It was played wearing the HoloLens headgear that can detect a user’s arm and then overlay it with holograms. The holographic arm can then be used to shoot flying robots and other objects bursting out through the walls. A Microsoft representative demonstrating ‘Project X Ray’ on stage said that Holograms act just like real objects, and can also interact with the environment.

To recall, Microsoft first gave us a demo if its HoloLens technology in January this year, showing off how holograms can be incorporated in our daily lives. Back then, the company said that the HoloLens will operate as a standalone computer. They also added that its augmented reality headset will feature “the most advanced holographic computer the world has ever seen,” which comes with a CPU, GPU and holographic processor that allows it create those interactive holographic environments. The company stressed upon the fact that its HoloLens is not just about being immersed in an experience, but also about having an interaction within the experience.

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