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Samsung Galaxy S7

Samsung says the Galaxy S7 family is safe. And those handsets are defective and liable to swell, leak or explode could only be caused by external damage.

Samsung has issued a blanket statement denying any perceived faults with the batteries of its Galaxy S7 family, and that any occurrence of leaking, swelling, and exploding batteries could have been caused by “external damage.”

However, there is a caveat: Samsung says it will have to physically examine a given handset to actually determine if there are faults with the battery or any other component before accepting any kinds of flaws with the Galaxy S7 smartphones.

Samsung has issued a statement: “Samsung stands behind the quality and safety of the Galaxy S7 family. There have been no confirmed cases of internal battery failures with these devices among the more than 10 million devices being used by consumers in the United States; however, we have confirmed a number of instances caused by severe external damage. Until Samsung is able to obtain and examine any device, it is impossible to determine the true cause of any incident.”

Recently, the South Korean company was pushed to stop shipping the Galaxy Note 7 after customers experienced and complained of severe safety issues with the phone. Now, iIt is apparent the company cannot afford any public disenchantment with its Galaxy S7 range, not in this coming holiday season.

Several consumers in the US, Australia, and other countries reported that following the disasters with the Galaxy Note 7 that led to its retirement. In fact, in the US, a class action has been brought against the Korean company over facts that recent battery problems with its smartphones may not be recent but affected older products as well.

While the company suffered a 30% profit decline year on year with the Galaxy Note 7, it is apparent the current wave of complaints the company is facing with its Galaxy S7 series will not bode well with its board and investors.

Samsung has been bold in making a sweeping statement on the safety of its devices’ batteries, but more remains to be seen, and consumers are advised to exercise precautions and necessary safety protocols in the use of these smartphones and any other mobile devices.

Have you experienced any swelling or leakage or short-circuiting of the Galaxy S7 family? Or has it ever gone up in smokes in your hands or while charging it? Make your comments below, and both industry watchers and Samsung will be glad to consider your experiences.

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