Apple iOS Chief Craig Federighi says iPhone users won’t have to kill background apps in multitasking to save battery as those are dormant anyway and do not draw any power.

That the usual chore of killing background apps usually followed by iPhone and iPad users is a waste of time has been proved once and for all with the confirmation to this coming from none other than the head of iOS at Apple, Craig Federighi.

Apple iPhones have often been picked up for being too generous on the battery front, and this could be the primary reason for iPhone users to devise ingenious ways of saving the precious juice. Killing the background apps in multitasking was perceived as one sure shot way of saving battery as having them alive in the background led to the common belief of them sipping on the juice, even if on a lesser scale.

Fortunately, for every such individual, a particular iPhone user by the name Caleb decided to field the question to the highest authority at Apple, Chief Executive Tim Cook himself. While Cook himself didn’t reply back, he got someone of the stature of Craig Federighi to do that. And being the iOS chief also makes Craig the best authority on put the confusion to rest.

The answer, ‘no and no’ is short, curt and sweet but drives right to the core of the issue.

‘Do you quit your iOS multitasking apps frequently and is this necessary for battery life?,’ Caleb had asked.

‘No and no,’ is all that Federighi answered.

See Also: Uninstall Facebook app to save 15% of iPhone 6s Battery Life, and more.

As things stand, the presence of apps in multitasking does not mean they are chipping away at battery power, unless the very functionality of the app demands so. For instance, if it’s a map app, then it’s supposed to be open for the entire duration of its usage and is designed to close once it’s no longer in use, like say after the user has reached the destination, set on the map.

However, there still might be times when the app needs to be manually closed though that only applies to special cases likewise the app is stuck and requires a hard reset. Otherwise, iPhone users should be fine having the apps in the multitasking view and can count on the benefit it thus poses, that of starting the moment it’s invoked.

See Also: Apple invites for ‘Let us loop you in’ March 21 event, to launch 4-inch iPhone SE, updated iPad.

In any case, it sure makes for a pleasant surprise to be replied back from those in the higher echelons of power though ex-CEO Steve Jobs have been known to regularly interact with customers.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here