There has already been quite some noise about Motorola likely working on re-introducing its iconic Razr phone but with enough changes incorporated in it to make it stand out in the 21st century. And we now have direct evidence of the same in the form of a new registration made with the World Intellectual Property Organisation revealing a few details of such a phone.

First off, the design reveals a huge resemblance with the Razr phone of yore but with modern bits embedded in it to make it sort of future proof. That includes a foldable display which happens to be current fad of the phone industry.

To the uninitiated, the old Razr phone used to fold down horizontally along the middle and opens up to reveal an assortment of buttons and a second screen on the top half. The exterior also housed a display where notifications used to be displayed, and the very concept of a phone with twin displays made it an instant hit during the time when feature phones ruled the roost and smartphones were still being conceptualized.

The design Lenovo owned Motorola filed with the WIPO also looks much the same in that there is a secondary display on the exterior which likely will also be showing the notifications and other messages. The phone then open up to reveal a seamless stretch of the display but having a thick chin at the bottom, the sort of which was also present on the original Razr phone.

Another unique design feature of the Motorola design is the lower chin that seems a bit raised but predictably houses the mic. Also, the lower chin is so designed so that the upper half sits flush with the rest of the phone in its unfolded state.

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On the whole, the design looks exciting enough for the new generation to yearn for the device that once rocked the phone world decades back. And the phone does seem to have enough futuristic features built in it to make it a likely success all over again.

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