Microsoft has sounded a fresh alert over usage of its now-defunct Internet Explorer browser, citing the discovery of a new vulnerability that can hijack the user’s entire PC itself.

Discovered by Clément Lecigne at the Threat Analysis Group within Google, the vulnerability is being described as a scripting engine memory corruption. To make matters worse, the flaw is inherent to all versions of Internet Explorer, including those for Windows 7, Windows 8.1 and even the latest Windows 10.

Elaborating on the issue, Microsoft said it is about a flaw in the IE browser that can cause the memory to be corrupted in a manner that the attackers come to have full access to the entire PC. That includes the attacker having the same administrative right as the rightful user and can do anything with the PC such as install or delete programs, copy data and so on.

The Redmond based company has also issued what it described as an emergency patch to plug the flaw. The company is also urging the user to install the patch right away, which is available as a standard Windows update or risk letting the attacker run malicious code on their PCs.

Fortunately, the use of Internet Explorer has come down sharply over recent times with the likes of Chrome or Firefox being the more dominant browsers at the moment. Microsoft too has been urging users to give up on IE and has also been pushing for the adoption of its Edge browser which it claims to be more safe and reliable alternative to the IE.

However, there are still many that swear by the good old IE and continue to be among its loyal user base. Its high time though that they should move ahead and adopt any of the new-gen browsers currently available to stay safe. Microsoft itself has announced it is adopting Chromium as the base for its Edge browser to make the latter more upmarket and compatible with most other browsers currently in use.

Meanwhile, a few systems have been found to have some sort of natural immunity against the IE bug. Those include Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows Server 2016 and Windows Server 2019. And the reason the latest bug may not be too severe on any of these platforms is that IE has a restricted presence on the above-mentioned platforms.

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In a nutshell, IE is dangerous and the best way to deal with the danger is to replace it with any of the modern browsers out there.

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